Tag Archives: Change Food

A Fond Farewell to TEDxManhattan

By Brittany Barton for Change Food

November 4, 2015

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Five years. 90 speakers. 7.2 million YouTube views. 494 viewing parties. 8 million people impacted. TEDxManhattan “Changing the Way We Eat” resonated across the world and made great strides for an improved food system. The five influential one-day events held from 2011 to 2015 were a nationally-recognized brand and a sought-after platform for individuals and organizations doing innovative work in sustainable food and farming. It provided innovators with an opportunity to raise their profile and reach far beyond their existing audiences. TEDxManhattan has had a significant impact, acting as a catalyst for new opportunities, spurring media coverage of new projects and leading to dynamic partnerships.

After five years of significant successes, TEDxManhattan has officially retired and we bid it a fond farewell. The impact of each event will live on in the projects, collaborations and new events made possible by TEDxManhattan.

We wanted to take an opportunity to thank and honor all of the speakers, participants, viewing party organizers, sponsors, volunteers and all those who attended the event. TEDxManhattan was all of us combined.


THE CONNECTIONS

More than anything, TEDxManhattan was about the people. It was about the connections, collaborations and friendships the events made possible. The selected speakers were given an opportunity to present their project or idea to a captive audience and each person walked away with a community of champions ready to support them.

And for some it completely changed their lives. Some speakers were new to the food movement and had never been exposed to such a receptive audience. Veteran food activists were ready and willing to lend their expertise. Below we’ve highlighted only a few of the incredible partnerships made possible by TEDxManhattan.

Audience member Susan Haar organized the Harvard Food Law Conference that has led to students organizing regionally and in other groups. She says, “I really want to say it never would have happened without (Diane Hatz) and TEDxManhattan. In one day you completely woke me up to the possibility of changing the food system and the urgency to do so.” The Harvard conference energized everyone in attendance and next steps proposed by students are already in the works – including a website, an alumni network, sharing of administrative resources for starting a student food law society, sharing of ideas for topics of student notes, cross-network projects, and an annual meeting.

Susan was introduced to 2015 TEDxManhattan speaker, Michele Merkel, Co-director of Food & Water Justice and invited her to be the keynote speaker for the Harvard Food Law Conference. It gave Michele’s justice program great exposure and also a view into the future of the legal efforts in the food movement.

Michele’s 2015 TEDxManhattan talk, “Using the legal system to fight factory farms” spurred a Food & Water Watch alert, and over 13,000 people took action against the EPA, asking them to reinstate the rule to create an inventory of CAFOs. This occurred within days of her video release.  Continue reading

Mouth-Watering Images of Monthly Produce Make Eating In-Season a Work of Art

Eating locally and in season is good for the planet, your local economy, and your body. “Locavore” chefs in the best restaurants around the world are adapting their menus to appeal to this sustainable and in-style way of eating (as foods taste better when they are appropriately ripe), influencing the consumption patterns of thousands and therefore the future of our food systems. All around, consuming foods produced within a one hundred mile radius from where you eat is a responsible way to interact with your environment.

Now it’s easy on the eyes as well. Artists Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin have done it again: the duo that brought us Food Maps, a series of photographs depicting the crops produced region by region around the world, has produced a new series of stunning images entitled Food Scans.

August’s range of juicy tomatoes (credit: Henry Hargreaves and Caitlin Levin)

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A Happy Oyster Season: Revitalizing Ecosystems and Communities

by Kelly Mertz for Change Food                                                                                                   September 10, 2015

Photo Courtesy of Samuel Alves Rosa

Photo Courtesy of Samuel Alves Rosa

For most of us, the passing of Labor Day represents the end of summer—a last call for beach days, vacations, and sweet summer produce. However, when one door closes, another one opens. On land, September brings a lush harvest of figs, pears, apples, eggplants, beets, green beans, cucumber, and so forth. In the water, and on the shores of Long Island in particular, September means oyster season, which runs through March. The mineral-rich mollusks are beginning to fatten themselves up to prepare for the brisk Northeastern winter, making their edible flesh meatier, more flavorful, and ready to be harvested and eaten by shellfish lovers around the world.

Oysters are an integral part of the ecosystems of both the Long Island Sound and the Great South Bay, as they thrive on the hard sea floors and saltiness of these waters. As a main agricultural product of the region, oyster harvesting is a mainstay in the economies of Long Island’s coastal towns, begetting township names such as Oyster Bay. About 35 miles from New York City, Oyster Bay has been the home of the Oyster Festival since 1983, which last year drew a crowd of 215,000 people. So for the people, animals, and environment of Long Island, oysters are a big deal.

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Change Food – our new program

Apologies for not keeping the Guide to Good Food blog updated – we’ve been in transition for a few months and are proud to announce our new program – Change Food.  More info….

Change Food’s vision is to help shift the U.S. food supply to a regional, sustainable food system where healthy, nutritious food is accessible to all.

Change Food’s mission is to help individuals change the way they eat by raising public awareness and educating consumers about problems with the U.S. food system.  It highlights what can and is being done to dismantle the ill effects of industrial agriculture as well as promoting sustainable solutions so that all people have access to healthy, nutritious food.

Goals of the program are to:

  1. Develop and implement creative projects that raise awareness and educate individuals about various aspects of the sustainable food and farming movement, as well as highlight problems with industrial agriculture and promote possible solutions
  2. Inspire and invigorate the sustainable food movement
  3. Reach beyond the already converted to a broader audience

The first project of Change Food is TEDxManhattan “Changing the Way We Eat.”  Change Food is a sponsor to the annual event and works throughout the year to market videos of the talks, disseminate educational materials related to speakers’ subject matter and bring innovative ideas from the event to the widest possible audience.

Change Food is headed by founder and executive director Diane Hatz.  Hatz brings with her 15 years of experience in the food movement, including her previous positions as executive producer of The Meatrix movies, founder and director of Sustainable Table, founder of the Eat Well Guide, and co-founder and director of The Glynwood Institute for Sustainable Food and Farming.  She is currently the organizer and host of TEDxManhattan.

“Not only do we need to raise more public awareness about problems and solutions with the U.S. food system, we also need to find ways to support each other and promote the work so many experts are doing,” says Hatz.  “And that is why Change Food has been launched.”

The ChangeFood.org website is currently in development.  In the meantime, you can like the program on Facebook at www.facebook.com/changefood or follow Change Food through Twitter @changeourfood.

Change Food is a nonprofit whose mission is to connect and transform the food we eat, the people who produce it, and the world in which it is grown. To read and learn more, visit The Guide to Good Food blog.