Tag Archives: Food Day

A Make-Over for the Food Drive

by Brittney Edwards for Change Food                                                                                            September 2, 2015

August 15 2015 - Ralston Farm and other 256This month’s community connection in the Change Food network is Pat O’Neil, founder and CEO of Amp Your Good. Pat grew up in a small family restaurant business which doubled as their rural community’s informal soup kitchen.  His childhood lesson of the importance of getting high quality food to those facing tough times led to his development of Amp Your Good and crowd-feeding.

In celebration of Food Day 2015, Pat and Amp Your Good decided to give the tired, old food drive of canned and boxed donations a make-over.  Amp Your Good’s unique approach has reinvented this service from being strictly limited to non-perishable foods, into a food drive that accommodates and celebrates real food, calling it the REAL Food drive Campaign.

This campaign allows organizations to hold food drives that raise REAL Food as donations – fruits and vegetables, locally grown produce, whole meals, and other healthy foods. Organizations can set up and run their food drives directly through Amp Your Good’s crowd feeding website. Here people can purchase food to donate to their chosen organization, and Amp Your Good will deliver the food donations directly to the food pantry, shelter or soup kitchen the food drive is supporting. The method is simple for organizations and donors, while also enormously increasing the usual reach of food drives.

The implications of this new food drive go far beyond supporting food access and healthy food. Organizations hosting a REAL food drive will also know the food they’re donating is organic, locally grown, restaurant quality and other types of REAL food. The consequence of this is the REAL Food Drive supports other causes within the food movement, such as local farming, reducing food waste, and protecting the environment.

The REAL Food Drive Campaign will last from September 15th to November 25th with Food Day (October 24th) in the middle, giving everyone in the food movement a chance to share their love of food with those who need it most. To help spread the word and get more info, you can visit www.RealFoodDrive.org.
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Celebrate Food Day with Dinner and Some Ed!

The Glynwood Institute’s Dinner and Some Ed
Are you looking for something to do for Food Day on October 24th?  How about joining The Glynwood Institute for Sustainable Food and Farming at a potluck on the Glynwood Farm in Cold Spring, New York, from 6:00 – 9:00pm or hosting your own Dinner and Some Ed?

What is Dinner and Some Ed?
Dinner and Some Ed is an effort to raise awareness, and enjoyment, of local, sustainable food.  All you need to do is host a meal made from local, sustainable ingredients and show a few videos related to food and farming.  We recommend TED and TEDx videos, especially TEDxManhattan videos.

The dinner can be potluck style, where friends and family participate in making the meal by bringing one dish or beverage; the host can prepare the meal, or you could do a combination of the two.

You are not confined to dinner – your event could be a lunch, brunch, picnic, or breakfast.  The key is to have a computer or mobile device where you can watch the talks and delicious sustainable food to share with friends.

Why Host Dinner and Some Ed?
Like most dinner parties, there will be good friends, good food, and stimulating conversation.  What makes Dinner and Some Ed different is the video talk can serve as a catalyst for conversation, leading to the sharing of ideas and knowledge.

Radical changes in agricultural practices have contributed to climate change, air, water and soil pollution, abuse of antibiotics, animal cruelty, and widespread obesity.  Serving sustainable food is a way to examine these problems and possible solutions.

And the food simply tastes better!

What To Do
Use your imagination when creating your dinner.  Some suggestions include:

  • Choose four talks and watch one before sitting down to each course.  You can have a bit of fun matching the talk with the course by incorporating some aspect of the talk into your ingredient selection.  Over each course you and your guests can discuss the talks or your experience finding the ingredients and preparing the food.  Encourage your guests to make their dish with ingredients from their local farmers market.  Have them share which farms they bought their food from.
  • Encourage your guests to buy meat, cheese, milk, or eggs that are either certified organic, humanely raised, or antibiotic free.
  • Challenge your guests to make a meal from only local ingredients (sourced within 200 miles from where they live).  Ask them to bring the recipe to their dish along with where they sourced the food.  Give a prize to the dish with the most locally sourced ingredients or the ingredient sourced from the closest place.
  • Ask your guests to come with their favorite video and let them host that particular part of the meal and the video.  Have them explain why they chose that particular talk.
  • Take your guests to a farmers market and have them split up into four groups.  Give each group a certain amount of money, e.g., $20, and tell them to buy ingredients for a particular course.  The groups will then cook their part of the meal together and present to the rest of the guests.  Make it even more fun and ask them to name their dish also!

After your meal, post up a review of your event on the Dinner and Some Ed site.

Happy Food Day!

Change Food is a nonprofit whose mission is to connect and transform the food we eat, the people who produce it, and the world in which it is grown. To read and learn more, visit The Guide to Good Food blog. 

Food Day, Time to Eat Real!

The first, and definitely not the last, Food Day will be October 24, 2011. Food Day aims to bring people from all walks of life, students, teachers, parents, health professionals, community organizers, chefs, local officials, and eaters, together to push for healthy, affordable food produced in a sustainable humane way.Eat Well Guide and Food Day

Events will be taking place across the country in schools, city halls, farmers markets, and state capitols.  Join thousands of Americans for a conversation about eating real.  To find an event near you, click here.  If there are no events taking place near where you live, why not host one?  There is still time to sign-up and organize an event. You can screen a movie, host a talk, harvest vegetables for a food bank, have a pot-luck, have a cooking demonstration, whatever you want, as long as it revolves around good food!

Still not convinced?  Read the Food Day priorities, if that doesn’t do it I’ll buy you a big mac.*

Why Eat Real?

  • Reduce diet-related diseases by promoting safe, healthy foods
  • Support sustainable farms and limit subsidies to big agribusiness
  • Expand access to food and alleviate hunger
  • Protect the environment and animals by reforming factory farms
  • Promote health by curbing junk-food marketing to kids
  • Support fair conditions to food and farm workers

* Statement made to emphasize point, my conscious won’t actually allow me to buy you a big mac.

Change Food is a nonprofit whose mission is to connect and transform the food we eat, the people who produce it, and the world in which it is grown. To read and learn more, visit The Guide to Good Food blog.